Stacy wins SIUE’s Paul Simon Outstanding Teacher-Scholar Award

Jason Stacy of SIUE, PhD, professor in the Department of History at the College of Arts and Sciences.

“Dr. Stacy models the academic activity of his students with his own work, while providing intellectual and practical advice that enables our graduate students to graduate in a timely manner.”

Jason Stacy, PhD, of Southern Illinois University in Edwardsville, professor in the Department of History at the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), was appointed on 2021 Paul Simon Award for Outstanding Teacher-Scholar recipient.

The highly competitive award is presented annually by the SIUE Graduate School to a faculty member who has a proven track record in the combination of scholarship and teaching. Recognition demonstrates the belief that to be a good teacher you must also be a good scholar. The laureates have made significant contributions to original research or creation activities and have succeeded in integrating these contributions into their teaching practices.

“I am honored to receive this award,” said Stacy. “I started my career as a high school history teacher and pursued higher education because it improved my teaching. As I progressed through my doctoral work, I found that research contributed to my history lessons and that my years as a professor had provided me with a broad contextual basis on which to base my research. . The Paul Simon Prize rewards this cross-fertilization that teachers and academics experience throughout their careers.

Stacy’s research interests include the pre-war period in the United States, social science education and journalism by Walt Whitman. Since joining SIUE faculty, he has published four books, four book-length editions on historical and educational topics, and five digital editions of Walt Whitman’s Journalism for the Walt Whitman Archives.

“Dr. Stacy is one of Whitman’s foremost literary and journalistic writing specialists in the United States, and an expert in pre-war intellectual and social history, ”wrote Allison Thomason, PhD, professor and head of the department of history. “His inspiration and his involvement with several of our doctoral students at the masters and at the cooperative are also exceptional. Dr. Stacy models the academic activity of his students with his own work, while offering intellectual and practical advice that enables our graduate students to graduate in a timely manner.

Last fall, Stacy joined the Walt Whitman Archives at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) as contributing editor to a three-year initiative funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) titled ” Walt Whitman’s Journalism: Finding the Poet in the Brooklyn Daily Times. Stacy has worked on numerous projects for the Walt Whitman Archives, which recorded 1.2 million pageviews and nearly 500,000 unique users from approximately 220 countries.

In 2016, Stacy and her colleagues received a grant from the Madison County Regional Office of Education to create an online encyclopedia and digital archive for Madison County. He has since worked with many undergraduate and graduate students to compile, edit, and present information via Madison Historical: The Online Encyclopedia and Digital Archives of Madison County, Illinois.

At SIUE, Stacy has taught courses in pre-war US history, US intellectual history, social science pedagogy, and applied historical methods. He includes students in his research projects as an Undergraduate Research and Creative Activities Mentor (URCA) and is a key member of many doctoral research projects and committees.

“While being a great educator and researcher is at the heart of this award, it is important to note that Dr. Stacy applies these skills to the professional development of his students,” wrote Nichol Allen, doctoral student in the cooperative doctoral program of the SIUE / SIUC. “He applies his experiences, research, knowledge and education to the advancement of students from all walks of life and openly shares the techniques, resources and tools of his trade to help them propel them further.

Stacy’s latest book, Spoon River America: Edgar Lee Masters and the Myth of the Small American Town, was released in May. Her work comments on Edgar Lee Masters’ anthology Spoon River, a collection of poems that has become a fundamental myth of small-town life in America. Stacy discusses how readers have adopted, debated, and reshaped Masters’ work in literary controversies and cultural skirmishes. He also analyzes Spoon River Anthology as the source of three archetypes – populist, elite, and exile – that endure in the landscape of American culture in the 21st century. This month, Stacy opened up about her motivations for writing the book on the press blog.

As the winner of the Paul Simon Award for Outstanding Teacher-Researcher, Stacy will introduce graduate students and faculty to her integration of research and teaching at the Graduate School’s fall awards ceremony.

By preparing the next generation of leaders in a knowledge economy, SIUE Higher School meets the region’s demand for highly qualified professionals. Graduate school offerings include arts and sciences, business, education, engineering, nursing, and interdisciplinary opportunities. SIUE professors provide students with a unique integration of theoretical education and practical research experiences. Students can earn graduate certificates or pursue a master’s degree and be part of a supportive learning and rich intellectual environment tailored to the needs of adult learners. The Graduate School increases the visibility of research and creative activity at SIUE, which ranks first among its peers on the Illinois Higher Education Council in total research and development spending, according to the National Science Foundation. Doctoral programs are available in nursing practice and educational leadership. Cooperative doctoral programs in environmental history, resources and policy, engineering and computer science are offered with SIU Carbondale.

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