Prenatal exposure to phthalates may affect infant health

Phthalates are endocrine disruptors used in plastics and as food additives. A recent study in Environmental toxicology and chemistry investigated whether prenatal exposure to phthalates in maternal and cord blood affects birth outcomes in infants.

The results of the study involving 65 mother-infant pairs suggest that phthalates have potential estrogenic effects in female infants and anti-androgenic effects in male infants. Additionally, higher levels of several different phthalates were associated with smaller head circumference in all infants.

“Following up study participants could help clarify the long-term impacts of phthalates on infant growth and health,” said corresponding author Pai-Shan Chen, PhD, of National Taiwan University. .

Further information

Link to the study: https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/etc.5280

About the journal

Environmental toxicology and chemistry (ETC) publishes articles describing original experimental or theoretical work that significantly advances understanding in the field of environmental toxicology, environmental chemistry, and hazard/risk assessment. ET&C is interdisciplinary in scope and incorporates the fields of environmental toxicology; environmental, analytical and molecular chemistry; ecology; physiology; biochemistry; microbiology; genetic; genomics; environmental genius; chemical, environmental and biological modelling; epidemiology; and earth sciences.

About Willey

Wiley is a global leader in research and education, unlocking human potential by enabling discovery, fueling education and shaping the workforce. For more than 200 years, Wiley has powered the global knowledge ecosystem. Today, our high-impact content, platforms and services help researchers, learners, institutions and businesses achieve their goals in an ever-changing world. Visit us atWiley.comlike us onFacebookand follow us onTwitterandLinkedIn.

/Public release. This material from the original organization/authors may be ad hoc in nature, edited for clarity, style and length. The views and opinions expressed are those of the author or authors.View Full here.

About Leslie Schwartz

Check Also

Stop obsessing over the latest lenses – It’s probably the least important part of shooting

Good photographic practice should consider all elements of creating an image, from technique and lighting …