Educational Journal – Radical Philosophy http://radicalphilosophy.org/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:03:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://radicalphilosophy.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/radical-philosophy-icon-150x150.png Educational Journal – Radical Philosophy http://radicalphilosophy.org/ 32 32 Clark County Commission approves short-term rental guidelines https://radicalphilosophy.org/clark-county-commission-approves-short-term-rental-guidelines/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 00:03:00 +0000 https://radicalphilosophy.org/clark-county-commission-approves-short-term-rental-guidelines/

A Nevada mandate to legalize short-term rentals in unincorporated Clark County reached a major milestone after commissioners laid the groundwork for implementing licensing, restrictions and enforcement.

That decision did not leave many people satisfied, including county lawmakers, who unanimously passed the ordinance on Tuesday.

“None of us here wanted to do this,” Commissioner Justin Jones said at one point during the lengthy meeting. “But that’s where we are.”

The county will issue licenses for up to 1% of the “housing stock”. And even then, there will be restrictions on where these licensed homes can be located – 1,000 feet from licensed homes and 2,500 feet from established resorts or those that have begun construction.

Regulated short-term rentals are already permitted in Las Vegas, Henderson and North Las Vegas.

“Clark County Commissioners today passed new rules that are tougher than required by state law and will take money out of the pockets of Nevada residents and the local tourism economy. “said John Choi, head of public policy for the western United States at Airbnb, in an emailed statement.

For landlords like Ronaldo Diaz’s mother – who started renting rooms in her home through Airbnb after an injury left her unable to work – the restrictions could mean an economic death knell, the man told commissioners during a briefing. a public comment.

And the lottery system in which the licenses will be distributed will drive people out of the market, Diaz said. “As it stands, these regulations that you’re trying to push through are going to wipe out a lot of Airbnb.”

The 2021 Nevada Legislature legalized the practice of using homes for commercial lodging, overturning Clark County’s current ban on July 1.

Jacqueline Flores, co-founder of the Greater Las Vegas Short Term Rental Association, told the Review-Journal on Wednesday that the organization, which represents about 1,200 members in southern Nevada, including about 700 in Clark County, was disappointed.

“It’s going to eliminate 80% of people who are renting short-term right now,” she said. “Most of these people are regular people just trying to make ends meet.”

She said the association has been in constant contact with the commissioners and that they were surprised that the guidelines were even stricter than those outlined by Nevada law.

“We’re still hoping they come to the table and try to resolve this issue,” Flores said, adding that the association was exploring legal options against the county.

Lottery system

Before applying for a business license, owners will first need to register to enter a “random number generator,” which is essentially a random electronic lottery system that will be run by a third party, lawmakers said.

Only completed applications will be accepted and homes must be claimed. That includes getting written permission from their landlords’ association if they live in a regulated community, the county said.

Mobile and manufactured homes, RVs, tents and pitches in Mt. Charleston, Moapa, Mesquite and Bunkerville will not be eligible.

The six-month selection process is scheduled to begin in September, after a month of county-led educational advertisements, and will end in March 2023.

Licenses and Fees

Selected homeowners will then pay a $45 inspection fee to apply for their home license, which is limited to one per applicant.

Annual licenses for homes with three bedrooms or less will cost $750. Those with more bedrooms will cost $1,500. Both types of licenses will also have an annual fire inspection fee of $150.

Licenses will not be transferable outside of a will or marriage, the county said.

Rentals will have a two night minimum stay and will only allow two people per room with a maximum of 10 people allowed at any one time.

Parties are prohibited.

The county will establish a 24/7 hotline where complaints can be reported. An owner’s representative must be contactable at all times of the day and will be given 30 minutes to respond.

Inspection process

County code enforcement chief Jim Anderson explained how it would work.

A code enforcement officer would visit the property, he said. At the same time, staff members will search the county database for listings of rental properties.

If the rental is found to be illegal, the service will contact the online platform to have the ad removed. For other violations, a notice will be sent to the owner, and if the issue isn’t fixed, they’ll start accumulating charges, Anderson said.

Platforms will have five business days to remove the listing, but critical situations can speed up the process, the county said.

Offenders can face fines ranging from $500 for first offenses up to $10,000 in subsequent fines.

Tech platforms, such as Airbnb and Vrbo, will collect taxes and send them to Clark County, officials said.

Additionally, platforms will pay an annual fee ranging from $1,000 for 100 or fewer homes listed on their platform to up to $75,000 for 7,000 or more homes.

The $10 average angered commissioner Marilyn Kirkpatrick.

“I’m sorry, guys, but when do we really regulate them, or do we let lobbyists tell us what to do,” she said, later returning to the lobbyist allegation questioned by Jones.

“I have a lot of problems with this order,” she added.

Commissioners estimate that there are currently over 10,000 illegally rented properties.

Anderson said the guidelines would help regulate illegal operators, describing them as a “massive first step”.

The regulations can be changed in the future to accommodate any wrinkles in the process, the commission said.

“It’s not promising,” Flores said.

Contact Ricardo Torres-Cortez at rtorres@reviewjournal.com. Follow @rickytwrites on Twitter.

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The University of Lief opens its doors https://radicalphilosophy.org/the-university-of-lief-opens-its-doors/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 07:00:26 +0000 https://radicalphilosophy.org/the-university-of-lief-opens-its-doors/

Valencia-based supplement manufacturer Lief Laboratories launched its University of Lief Mechanical Foundations training program with Santa Clarita’s College of the Canyons, marking an effort by the company to train local talent for positions at Lief and eventually other local businesses.

The move comes as a solution at a time when the talent pool at all levels, from blue-collar workers to middle managers and executives, has become strained, according to Lief’s chief executive. Adel Villalobos.

“People need to have a lot more technical skills at all levels, a lot more computer skills, and a lot more adaptive skills in order to handle changing technologies and environments,” Villalobos told The Business Journal in a previous post. interview, adding that Covid-19 has accelerated the need for technical aptitude.

The initiative was designed with the help of College of the Canyons leaders who identified instructors and developed the curriculum, which will guide employed students through roles that will equip them with the skills and knowledge needed for careers and careers. advancement at Lief.

The initial session at Lief University will last 14 weeks at Lief’s Avenue Paine headquarters, where participants will receive instruction in the basics of electricity, hydraulics, tooling, print reading and other areas. Instruction in these subjects will prepare participants for positions including chefs, mechanics and operators.

“Lief University and the development of an educational program that invests in our employees to provide them with increased skills to support them in their professional and personal journeys has been a dream of mine for some time and I am honored to see that vision come to fruition now. a reality,” said Villalobos. “I am extremely grateful to the Chancellor (Diana) van hook and College of the Canyons for their tremendous support in helping us realize this vision.

Lief plans to expand the university initiative in the future to a larger training center at another of the company’s facilities to offer courses to the community and students outside of Lief’s employee base.

“I also look forward to expanding Lief University in the future to…help build a stronger skilled workforce, not only in our company, but for the wider Santa Valley region. Clarita,” Villalobos said. “As a member of the Los Angeles CEO Council, it is also one of my commitments to ensure that our California workforce remains competitive and that we create the right environment for businesses and communities to thrive.”

Student employees of Lief were welcomed to the first day of classes at an event at the company’s headquarters in Valencia on June 6. Official program speakers included Villalobos, Van Hook and Bardia Eslamivice president of engineering and technology at Lief.

The college covers a service area of ​​367 square miles and served 33,481 students in Valencia and Canyon Country during the 2019/2020 academic year, according to the school’s website.

“By creating on-site training courses tailored to specific business needs, (College of the Canyons) provides businesses with a competitive advantage by staying at the forefront of their industry. Additionally, the instruction employees receive creates a pathway to further career development learning opportunities at College of the Canyons, Van Hook said, adding that the college will see how it can further develop the program.

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Access to education is a fundamental right https://radicalphilosophy.org/access-to-education-is-a-fundamental-right/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 06:57:51 +0000 https://radicalphilosophy.org/access-to-education-is-a-fundamental-right/

Prayagraj: The Allahabad High Court observed that receiving adequate education is a fundamental right enshrined in Article 21-A of the Constitution of India.

The bench consisting of Justices Rajesh Singh Chauhan and Subhash Vidyarthi further observed that education authorities must ensure that the grievance relating to admission to an institution is resolved quickly and does not go unanswered.

The bench dealt with the case of a certain Tanishk Srivastava, a pupil of class 8.

He participated in the entrance test organized on March 20 to be admitted as a resident researcher at La Martiniere College, Lucknow, in class 8.

On March 25, the results were announced and Tanishk was declared successful and eligible for admission to class 8 as a resident researcher.

However, due to his mother’s serious illness and his father’s absence, he was unable to join the school.

Therefore, his father filed an application on April 4 in front of the school management and hoped that instead of treating his son as a resident scholar, he could be admitted as an external scholar because he is ready to fulfill all the formalities required, including fees. .

When the appellant/petitioner, the candidate’s father, was not informed of the fate of his son’s admission until April 18, he filed a motion for an order in court which was denied by a single judge.

Disputing the writ petition, the candidate’s father filed an immediate appeal to the divisional bench.

The court upheld the single judge’s order which rejected the writ plea on the grounds that since the institution was an unassisted minority private institution, therefore, the writ petition against it could not be granted.

However, before dismissing the appeal, the court observed that the institution should have conveyed the specific information (whether Tanishk can be admitted to the school as a resident scholar) to the student’s parents at the earliest so that appropriate measures can be taken by his parents.

Allahabad High Court said: “This is not a case where the student failed to qualify the entrance exam to be admitted to a particular class, but this is a case where this student qualified for this entrance exam as a resident scholar, but due to compelling and unavoidable circumstances, he could not be admitted as a resident scholar.

“Therefore, in such compelling circumstances, at least on the basis of principles of fairness, it was the bare minimum required of the school principal to inform the pupil’s parents that the school would not would not be able to admit their ward in class 8 as an external student.

The bench also held that if the request of the pupil/parents of the pupil was not likely to be accepted by the school, this decision should have been immediately communicated to the parents so that the pupil could be admitted to any other establishment to receive the education which is a fundamental right enshrined in Article 21-Aa.

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Ruth B. Ciesielski | News, Sports, Jobs https://radicalphilosophy.org/ruth-b-ciesielski-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 06:34:05 +0000 https://radicalphilosophy.org/ruth-b-ciesielski-news-sports-jobs/

Ruth B. Ciesielski

Ruth B. Ciesielski, 80, of Jamestown, NY, formerly of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, died at 9:17 a.m. Friday, June 10, 2022 at UPMC Chautauqua.

She was born on November 14, 1941 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, the daughter of the late Samuel and Ella Loeb Klein.

Ruth was a graduate of Central Dauphin High School in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and earned her bachelor’s degree from Penn State University (University Park) in Elementary Education. She earned her master’s degree from Penn State University in Student Personnel College Administration with a minor in international government and completed all but her doctoral dissertation.

Prior to her retirement in 1998, Ruth was employed as Registrar of Jamestown Community College where she worked for 25 years (1973-98). At Jamestown Community College, she also served as Division Chair of the Department of Human Development and Educational Services and Director of Institutional Research. Ruth has also served as the chair of the Mid-State Accreditation Committee for the JCC several times. She also created and hosted JCC’s College/Career Day, an annual event that has served high schools in Chautauqua County for over 25 years.

Ruth had previously been employed at Harrisburg Area Community College as the first Director of Financial Aid (1966-1969). While at HACC, Ruth twice published research studies in national peer-reviewed publications. She also helped establish and served as an officer of the Pennsylvania Financial Aid Directors Association. In previous years, Ruth worked at SUNY in Oswego from 1965 to 1966 as assistant dean of students and at Pennsylvania State University in several positions in student affairs from 1963 to 1965 and from 1969 to 1971. Over the years , Ruth has served on statewide professional committees in New York and Pennsylvania, and has been a member of several professional organizations.

She was chair for several years of the Hewes BOCES Advisory Board, was a member of the United Way of Southern Chautauqua County Board of Directors, served on the Chautauqua County Meals on Wheels Board of Directors, and was a member of the Lakewood Rod & Auxiliary Gun Club.

Surviving is her husband, Joseph A. Ciesielski, whom she married on September 12, 1971; several nieces, nephews and extended family.

Besides her parents, she was predeceased by her brother, Lawrence A. Klein, who died on April 14, 2021.

A private service will be held at the convenience of the family. Interment will be in Sunset Hill Cemetery. Visits will not be observed.

Submissions may be made to the Jamestown Community College Foundation Scholarship Fund, 715 Falconer St. Jamestown, NY 14701.

You can leave words of condolence for Ruth’s family at www.lindfuneral home.com.

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Around 7,000 new classrooms are being built this year: CM Bommai https://radicalphilosophy.org/around-7000-new-classrooms-are-being-built-this-year-cm-bommai/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 06:45:00 +0000 https://radicalphilosophy.org/around-7000-new-classrooms-are-being-built-this-year-cm-bommai/

Karnataka Chief Minister Basavaraj Bommai said he was dedicated to the development of North Karnataka while addressing a campaign meeting for Legislative Council election for graduate and teacher seats du Nord-Ouest at the KLE Society in Belagavi on Saturday.

He also highlighted the role of KLE in the development of the southern state, saying that Arun Shahapur and Hanumath Nirani are ideal candidates who will not disappoint voters if elected.

“The contribution of the Maharajas of Mysuru and KLE society is enormous in the development of the state, the contribution of KLE in the education sector is enormous especially in North Karnataka. President Prabhakar Kore led KLE Society on a noble path. institutions, KLE Society has grown into a mega-organization with 278 educational institutions over the past three decades under the capable leadership of Kore, Bommai said.

He made his position on state education policy clear and said it was the government’s top priority.

“My government gives top priority to education. About 7,000 new classrooms are being built this year. About 15,000 teachers would be recruited, it was decided to upgrade 7 government engineering schools to standards of ITI,” he added.

He also mentioned that there will be links with foreign universities, a center of excellence will be established at the Rajiv Gandhi University of Health Sciences and the new education policy is being implemented in the country. ‘State.

“Belagavi is a center of knowledge and skills. It has become the most important city after Bangalore,” he concluded.

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The program seeks to buy local products https://radicalphilosophy.org/the-program-seeks-to-buy-local-products/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 22:00:23 +0000 https://radicalphilosophy.org/the-program-seeks-to-buy-local-products/

EAST WILTON — Local farmers with produce to sell are being sought for a program that will provide food boxes to family daycares.

The Child and Adult Food Program, CACFP, is reimbursing home daycares for following healthy meal and snack guidelines, program coordinator Meghan Parker-Crockett said Wednesday, June 8. Child care centers are reimbursed per meal, per snack as long as they follow the guidelines, she noted. .

“This [food box] program we’re doing is an extra thing,” Parker-Crockett said. “We applied for a grant late last year through the TEGNA Foundation. We received $5,000 and will be providing our child care providers with local food boxes throughout the summer.

“We try to provide children in community daycares with access to fruits and vegetables for their optimal growth and development. We know that with the shortages we have seen, especially in grocery stores [access may be limited]. Soon after food is picked, it begins to lose its nutritional value. If we can get some of these local foods into our child care centers, these children will receive the most nutritious food possible. It will also boost our local economy.

“We are considering at least three different local food deliveries. We will contact local farmers to provide these boxes. We also partner with Maine Grains to provide a box of whole grain flours, cornmeal, barley, etc. Beans will also be part of it.

Parker-Crockett said the products would be purchased from local farmers. All farmers interested in participating should email [email protected]

“I worked with local farmers with [Women, Infants and Children program at Western Maine Community Action] for many years, she said. “We want to give all farmers an equal opportunity to apply.”

A similar program was in place in 2019 but was phased out due to COVID-19 restrictions, Parker-Crockett said.

Nutrition education materials will also be available for child care providers and parents, she said. Colleague Amanda Moody will work on these materials while Parker-Crockett will be responsible for budgeting and connecting with farmers.

Child care centers in the greater Franklin County area are eligible to participate and many are already signed up, Moody said Wednesday afternoon. Interested vendors should call 207-860-4485.

Information on how daycares and parents themselves can access local foods will also be shared.

“Most of our daycares are in low-income areas, so we’re also addressing that by providing local food boxes,” Parker-Crockett said.

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DIY is hosting a two-month online global summer camp https://radicalphilosophy.org/diy-is-hosting-a-two-month-online-global-summer-camp/ Tue, 07 Jun 2022 22:40:17 +0000 https://radicalphilosophy.org/diy-is-hosting-a-two-month-online-global-summer-camp/

“DIY.org is hosting a two-month online global summer camp”

DIY is a skill-based platform that engages kids through social learning

DIY – The social learning app, the largest online community based on children’s interests, kicks off another year of its online summer camp: Camp DIY. Children from all over the world can join the two-month camp anytime between June 6 and July 31.

Online Summer Camp for Kids offers a variety of fun and educational activities that will keep kids engaged and excited all summer long. There will be weekly themes for daily crafts, games and activities, there’s something for kids of all learning styles and interests.

Camp DIY offers the following activities:

  • “Boot Camps” exploring building a new skill each week

  • Online theme nights, tournaments and talent shows

  • Game and quiz sessions

  • Movie and book appreciation events

  • A “daily challenge” that keeps campers on their toes

  • Team challenges to earn points for a camp winning team

It’s DIY co-founder Tripti Ahuja’s favorite time of year at DIY. She and co-founder Bhavik are always happy to see more kids signing up each season.

“Through DIY Camp, we hope to enable more and more families and students around the world to have an amazing summer filled with fun learning, healthy competition, skill development, discovering new hobbies favorites and (online) outings with other kids around the world who have the same interests – without the crazy costs of traditional summer camps,” Ahuja said.

Besides Camp DIY, the platform is also going the Freemium route in that it now offers all of its inspiring learning content absolutely free. The content is aimed at kids ages 7-13 so they can explore hundreds of skills in areas like STEM, art, crafts, games, and coding.

Parents can upgrade to a DIY Plus subscription via a seven-day free trial. DIY Plus features allow kids to post content and share their creativity, interact with kids from over 170 countries, make friends based on common interests, participate in over 100 interactive workshops in live every month and enter contests to win prizes.

Child safety is the top priority at DIY. It’s COPPA compliant, KidSafe certified, and moderated 24/7 in all time zones. Parents get notifications whenever their child posts something on the social learning app.

All DIY content is available for free on the app. To download DIY from the App Store or Google Play, go to diy.org/download. To access additional premium features, visit diy.org/register.

Crafting connects kids who share interests because we know creativity is contagious! We are the world’s largest interest-based community where learning happens through how-to videos, hands-on projects, and live interactive workshops. Kids can explore hundreds of skills in areas like STEM, art, crafts, fun crafts, games, coding – and everything in between. The platform allows people to think, learn and create in a secure environment facilitated by experts and mentors 24/7, in all time zones.

Media Contact
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Ripley Superintendent Honored by County Group | News, Sports, Jobs https://radicalphilosophy.org/ripley-superintendent-honored-by-county-group-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 06:31:21 +0000 https://radicalphilosophy.org/ripley-superintendent-honored-by-county-group-news-sports-jobs/

Ripley Central School Superintendent William Caldwell was completely surprised when he was named Administrator of the Year by the Chautauqua County Board of Education Professionals Association.

“I didn’t know I was going to be chosen” said Caldwell of the prize, which was awarded to CCAEOP “bosses’ night” May 19 dinner.

“It’s a pretty big honour” Caldwell added.

CCAEOP is an organization of educational secretaries and office staff. It is the belief of the organization that “The quality of the services provided by the professionals of the education office directly influences the efficiency of the service provided by the educational institution as a whole. »

Caldwell was nominated for the award by his secretary, Vickie Mosier, who had written a nomination letter which she read over dinner.

“The letter was very humble,” said Caldwell. “It meant so much more to me as I stood there listening to her read about the things she noticed.”

In her letter of appointment, Mosier noted that Caldwell is not only an excellent superintendent, but that she puts people first, whether they are employees or students.

“Bill is first and foremost a human being, then an administrator”, she says. “He’s an amazing superintendent, but, more importantly, he’s a kind-hearted, sympathetic and understanding human being.”

Mosier cited several examples of Caldwell’s concern for employees. At the start of the pandemic, when so much was uncertain, Caldwell was very concerned about making sure employees got paid, she said.

“The question I kept hearing him repeat: ‘Can I keep paying my employees? These people should be paid. Some of my relatives live paycheck to paycheck. … He repeatedly spoke to me about the employees and their paychecks, concern covering every inch of his tired, worn face, she says.

Caldwell was always mindful of the needs employees faced outside of the school setting, Mosier said. She noted several examples, including one that involved him, where he focused on his staff’s personal concerns, saying ‘family comes first,’” she said.

“His concern is for the human being first and for the work, then.”

Caldwell also cares about students, Mosier said.

“Recently, a student had serious problems at home. … So what does he do? He asks me to gather all the materials needed to make slime. He rolled up his sleeves and together, with another student, they made slime,” she says.

Mosier said he saw this concern for students on several occasions.

“I can’t tell you the number of times I’ve peeked into Bill’s office to find him on the floor talking quietly with a struggling student, reading a book, or just sitting quietly for a while” , she says. “These students always leave more serene and much happier than when they arrived.”

Mosier noted that CCAEOP recently updated its constitution and purpose, stating that the organization “to promote the continued professional growth of all education professionals to help members meet the challenges of their positions, to help members network with colleagues throughout the county, to recognize members for their outstanding dedication to their profession and to develop leadership and team building skills among members.”

Caldwell said CCAEOP has been dormant for a little while. The organization felt it was important to resume operations at this point, he said. They give out awards for Office Professional of the Year and Administrator of the Year, as well as two scholarships.

Since it was “bosses’ evening”, Caldwell’s wife was not present at the dinner.

“She had no idea” he said. “She was pretty excited when she walked in and (the award) was sitting on the counter.

Caldwell said receiving the award was a career highlight.

“I was honored and thought it was a great asset to my career,” he said. “It means a lot to me to receive this award.”



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Calendar of events around Jacksonville, Illinois this week https://radicalphilosophy.org/calendar-of-events-around-jacksonville-illinois-this-week/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 06:21:15 +0000 https://radicalphilosophy.org/calendar-of-events-around-jacksonville-illinois-this-week/ Farmers Market: 7 a.m. to noon, Pathway Plaza, 1905 W. Morton Ave. Prices vary. | Every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday until October 31. Link cards accepted.

Lincoln Days Civil War Reenactment: 9 a.m. Pittsfield Lake. | Living history weekend including a battle re-enactment. Also, ladies’ tea and fashion show, children’s games, crafts and more.

Winchester United Methodist Men’s Competition: 9 a.m., corner of Scottys, 10 E Cherry St., Winchester. Pork chops $4. Hot dogs $1 | For more information, call 217-742-3610.

Children’s fishing derby: 9 a.m. to noon, Roodhouse Lake. Free | For ages 16 and under. Registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Free lunch.


The basics of breastfeeding: 9:30 a.m., Jacksonville Memorial Hospital, 1600 W. Walnut St. | Class led by a lactation consultant. For more information, call 217-245-9541.

Art in the yard: 10 a.m.-12 p.m., The David Strawn Art Gallery, 331 W. College Ave. Admission $5 | Presented by the Art Association of Jacksonville. Enjoy art projects with your children. Children must be accompanied by a parent. Outdoor entertainment on the lawn.

Pike County Museums: Noon to 4 p.m., Pike County Museums, 340 E. Jefferson St., Pittsfield. | Historic East School and Museum, Pike County All-Wars Museum and Pike County Military Heritage Museum are open for the season every Saturday and Sunday.

Woodlawn Farm Tours: 1-4 p.m., Woodlawn Farm, 1463 Gierke Road. Suggested donation $5 for adults, $3 for children under 10. | Educational tour of an 1840s farmhouse that was an Underground Railroad site.

Terry Beck: 3 p.m., Grafton Winery and Brewhaus, 300 W. Main St. | Live music.

Pork chop dinner: 5-7 p.m., Manchester Village Park. $11 | All proceeds will go to the Manchester Cemetery Association. The menu includes: a pork chop or a pork burger, sides, dessert and a drink. 217-370-0599.

Hakuna Moscato Sunset Cruise: 6:30 p.m., Port of Grafton, 215 W. Water St. $31 | For more information, call 618-786-7678 or visit graftonharbor.com.

Hookie: 7 p.m., Grafton Oyster Bar, 215 W. Water St. | Live music.

Bob Glenson: 8 p.m., Bloody Bucket, 201 E. Main St., Grafton. | Live music.

Sunday

Lincoln Days Civil War Reenactment: 9 a.m. Pittsfield Lake. | Living history including battle re-enactment and more.

Pike County Museums: Noon to 4 p.m., Pike County Museums, 340 E. Jefferson St., Pittsfield. | Historic East School and Museum, Pike County All-Wars Museum and Pike County Military Heritage Museum are open for the season every Saturday and Sunday.

Woodlawn Farm Tours: 1-4 p.m., Woodlawn Farm, 1463 Gierke Road. Suggested donation $5 for adults, $3 for children under 10. | Educational tour of an 1840s farmhouse that was an Underground Railroad site.

Acoustic DNA: 2 p.m., Grafton Winery and Brewhaus, 300 W. Main St. | Live music.

Erik Brooks: 2 p.m., The Bloody Bucket, 201 E. Main St., Grafton. | Live music.

The owl : 3-7 p.m., Loading Dock, 401 E. Front St., Grafton | Live music.

Bible Discourses: 4 p.m., Jenkins Education Complex, 409 Hardin Ave. | Sign language interpretation available. For more information, call Dana Jacobsen at 224-422-0217 or Kamela LiaBraaten at 309-415-1933.

Pilot Club of Jacksonville Concert in the Park: 6 p.m., Jacksonville Community Park, 1309 S. Main St. Free | Live music by The Peeks & John Eddy. Bring lawn chairs or a blanket.

Willie Catfish: 8 p.m., The Bloody Bucket, 201 E. Main St., Grafton. | Live music.

Monday

Gift of products and bakery: 9 a.m. to noon, Jacksonville Food Center, 316 E. State St. Free | For residents of Morgan County.

Community walking group: 11 a.m., Boyd Hospital Wellness Center, Eighth and School Streets, Carrollton. Free for Wellness Center members, $1 for non-members. | For more information or to register, call Dawn at 217-942-6946 ext. 1352.

Free lunch: 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Salvation Army, 331 W. Douglas Ave. | Meals in take-out containers can be picked up at the side door.

Walking for well-being: 12:30-3pm, First Christian Church, 2106 S. Main St. Free | Indoor walking program offered year-round Monday through Thursday. For more information, call 217-243-6445.

Spirit of Faith Soup Kitchen: 3:30-4pm, Spirit of Faith Soup Kitchen, 105 E. Dunlap St. Free | Serve take-out meals for anyone in need.

Tuesday

Farmers Market: 7 a.m. to noon, Pathway Plaza, 1905 W. Morton Ave. Prices vary. | Every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday until October 31. Link cards accepted.

Gift of products and bakery: 9 a.m. to noon, Jacksonville Food Center, 316 E. State St. Free | For residents of Morgan County.

Free lunch: 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Salvation Army, 331 W. Douglas Ave. | Meals in take-out containers can be picked up at the side door.

Walking for well-being: 12:30-3pm, First Christian Church, 2106 S. Main St. Free | Indoor walking program offered year-round Monday through Thursday. For more information, call 217-243-6445.

Spirit of Faith Soup Kitchen: 3:30-4pm, Spirit of Faith Soup Kitchen, 105 E. Dunlap St. Free | Serve take-out meals for anyone in need.

Bluffs Market: 4-6 p.m., Bluffs Town Center Square. Prices vary. | Crafts, vendors, farmer’s market, flea market and more. Every Tuesday until Labor Day.

Wednesday

Gift of products and bakery: 9:00 a.m., noon, Jacksonville Food Center, 316 E. State St. Free | For residents of Morgan County.

Story time: 10:00 a.m., Jacksonville Public Library, 201 W. College Ave. Free | Stories and a job. For more information, call 217-243-5435 or email clangdon@jaxpl.org.

Free lunch: 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Salvation Army, 331 W. Douglas Ave. | Meals in take-out containers can be picked up at the side door.

Brown Bag Lunch in the park: 12 p.m. to 1 p.m., Art Zeeck Park, Beardstown. Meal $3 including drink and dessert. | Every Wednesday in June. Music by White Lightning.

Walking for well-being: 12:30-3pm, First Christian Church, 2106 S. Main St. Free | Indoor walking program offered year-round Monday through Thursday. For more information, call 217-243-6445.

Distribution of food products: 1:15 p.m., Salvation Army, 331 W. Douglas Ave. Free | For residents eligible for Morgan County income. Bring proof of residency and a box for food.

Spirit of Faith Soup Kitchen: 3:30-4pm, Spirit of Faith Soup Kitchen, 105 E. Dunlap St. Free | Serve take-out meals for anyone in need.

Community walking group: 3:30 p.m., Boyd Hospital Wellness Center, Eighth and School Streets, Carrollton. Free for Wellness Center members, $1 for non-members. | For more information and to register, all Dawn at 217-942-6946 ext. 1352.

County Line Dancing Club Class: 6:30 p.m., The Hangout Bar & Grill, 901 W. Superior Ave. $5.

Thursday

Farmers Market: 7 a.m. to noon, Pathway Plaza, 1905 W. Morton Ave. Prices vary. | Every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday until October 31. Link cards accepted.

Drop-off days citywide: 7am-2pm, City of Jacksonville Street Department, 200 W. Oak St. | Throw out unused and unwanted items. No hazardous waste, liquids, motor oil or paint – including dried or solidified – landscape waste, concrete, rocks or dirt, batteries or tires.

Community Health Collaborative Network Meetings: 8:30 a.m. to 10 a.m. Jacksonville Memorial Hospital virtual event. Free | Anyone interested in sharing our vision of creating the healthiest community in America is welcome to join us. Join the meeting by calling 217-480-9301 and using meeting ID 88465810#.

Gift of products and bakery: 9 a.m. to noon, Jacksonville Food Center, 316 E. State St. Free | For residents of Morgan County.

Sunny days ahead with the family: 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m., State Museum of Illinois, 502 S. Spring St., Springfield. Free | Celebrate the start of summer vacation with activities for the whole family. For more information, email events@illinoisstatemuseum.org or call 217-782-6044.

Free lunch: 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Salvation Army, 331 W. Douglas Ave. | Meals in take-out containers can be picked up at the side door.

Walking for well-being: 12:30-3pm, First Christian Church, 2106 S. Main St. Free | Indoor walking program offered year-round Monday through Thursday. For more information, call 217-243-6445.

Spirit of Faith Soup Kitchen: 3:30-4pm, Spirit of Faith Soup Kitchen, 105 E. Dunlap St. Free | Serve take-out meals for anyone in need.

Healthy Communities Collaborative Career Fair: 4-6 p.m., downtown Jacksonville. Free admission, free parking. | On-site interviews with 50 employers.

Friday

Drop-off days citywide: 7am-2pm, City of Jacksonville Street Department, 200 W. Oak St. | Throw out unused and unwanted items. No hazardous waste, liquids, motor oil or paint – including dried or solidified – landscape waste, concrete, rocks or dirt, batteries or tires.

Greene County Health and Career Fair: 8am-3pm, Carrollton Square, Carrollton. | Vendors, food, laboratory services, children’s activities. The rainy date is June 24. Sponsored by Greene County Health Department and Boyd Health Services. For more information, visit greenecountyhd.org.

Gift of products and bakery: 9 a.m. to noon, Jacksonville Food Center, 316 E. State St. Free | For residents of Morgan County.

Archeology Fridays: 10-11:30 a.m., Old Kampsville Elementary School. Free | For children in kindergarten through third grade. Sessions take place every Friday until August 8, with the exception of July 15. Each week has a different theme, craft activity and game. Registration suggested at education@caa-archeology.org or 618-653-4316.

Take a Tour in Edgewise: An Interactive Art and Story Experience: 11 a.m.-noon, Illinois State Museum, 502 S. Spring St., Springfield. Free | Part of Downtown Springfield’s History Comes Alive summer series. For more information, email events@illinoisstatemuseum.org or call 217-782-6044.

Free lunch: 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m., Salvation Army, 331 W. Douglas Ave. | Meals in take-out containers can be picked up at the side door.

Gift of products and bakery: 12:30 p.m.-1 p.m., Salvation Army, 331 W. Douglas Ave. Free.

Soulard Blues Band: 5 p.m., Loading Dock, 401 E. Front St., Grafton. | Live music.

Downtown Jacksonville Main Street Concert Series: 7-9 p.m., Central Park, downtown Jacksonville. | Randy McAllister plays. Refreshments on sale 6 p.m. Bring lawn chairs or blankets.

To submit items to the calendar, go to myjournalcourier.com and select “calendar”, or email jjcsocial@myjournalcourier.com. Articles must be submitted at least 48 hours in advance.

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Marion College students receive end-of-year honors | Hillsboro Star-Journal https://radicalphilosophy.org/marion-college-students-receive-end-of-year-honors-hillsboro-star-journal/ Wed, 01 Jun 2022 21:56:39 +0000 https://radicalphilosophy.org/marion-college-students-receive-end-of-year-honors-hillsboro-star-journal/

Marion Middle School released this list of its 2021-22 student awards last week:

ROLL OF HONOR

High

Grade 8 – Harrison Beery, Cooper Brewer, Samuel Calvert, Maria Carlson, Shaliah Ensley, Daisy Giles, Vlad Harris, Hailey Harshman, Madisyn Hulett, Elijah Klenda, Keenan Lange, Kadon Mercer, Jaxon Salsbury, Eldon Smith and Gabrielle Stuchlik.

Grade 7 – Margaret Collett, Zayden Janzen, Dylan Kraus, Teegan Kraus, Jessica Methvin, Kaelynn Metro, Jordy Raymer, Eliza Richardson, Liran Wasmuth, Kate Wessel, and Isaac Wesner.

Grade 6 – Myles Ash, Sybil Bowman, Izabell Branson, Alexandra Carlson, Reagan Cooper, Kael Dameron, Hugh Guetterman, Kevon Jones, Ryder Kraus, Ellie Nelson, Brooklynn Ottensmeier, Kayleigh Pacelli, Ryker Salsbury, Brylee Smith, Grayson Smith, Haley Suffield , Shelby Summerville, Aubrey Whiteman and Kierstin Wildin.

Usual

Grade 8 – Jessi Hayes, Shyann Harris, Kayla McPhail, Jesse Snyder, and Kate Watkins.

Grade 7 – Ava Box, Delaney Hostetler, Jackson Howard, Cooper Jirak, Titus Mason, Kaden Smith, Hitch Be, and Tandice Tajchman.

Grade 6 – Cadence Bialek, Dalton Boone, Jeremiah Nienstedt, Reese Oursler and Rylee Thomas.

Honorable mention

Grade 8 – Molly Bradfield, Kattie Stultz, Wyatt Be and Breane Williams.

Grade 7 – Maddison Beery, Brylee Haws, Christian Pacelli and Noah Schmidt.

Grade 6 – Brooklyn Beery, Morgan Dixon, Sofia Frohlich-Phipps, Wyatt Ostlee, Braydn Pohlman, and Austin Richardson.

PRICE

Academic Excellence – Harrison Beery, Maria Carlson, Madisyn Hulett, Elijah Klenda and Kadon Mercer.

Citizenship — Gabrielle Stuchlik and Kadon Mercer.

Presidential Educational Excellence – Harrison Beery, Samuel Calvert, Maria Carlson, Shaliah Ensley, Daisy Giles, Shayann Harris, Vlad Harris, Hailey Harshman, Jessi Hayes, Madisyn Hulett, Elijah Klenda, Keenan Lange, Kadon Mercer, Jaxon Salsbury, Eldon Smith, Jesse Snyder and Gabrielle Stuchlik.

Spelling — 1. Alexandra Carlson, 2. Vlad Harris and 3. Cheyenne Voyles.

Bandaged

Outstanding Student – Maria Carlson.

District Honor Band – Daisy Giles (flute), Shyann Harris (baritone saxophone), Hailey Harshman (flute), Keenan Lange (French horn) and Jessica Methvin (trumpet).

State Honor Band – Shyann Harris (baritone saxophone).

League Solos – Maria Carlson (flute, rating I), Keenan Lange (French horn, II+) and Vyolett Dawson and Hailey Harshman (flute, II).

League Brass Ensemble (Class I) – Harrison Beery, Lexi Branson, Samuel Calvert, Vlad Harris, Madisyn Hulett, Keenan Lange, Kadon Mercer, Jessica Methvin, Colt Smith, Eldon Smith, Leroy Wessel and Owen White.

League Flute Ensemble (I) — Maria Carlson, Vyolett Dawson, Daisy Giles, Hailey Harshman, Delaney Hostetler, Dylan Kraus, Kayla McPhail, Jaxon Salsbury, Gabrielle Stuchlik, Kate Wessel and Cheyenne Wilson.

League Flute Quartet (I) — Maria Carlson, Daisy Giles, Hailey Harshman and Gabrielle Stuchlik.

League Wind Ensemble (I) — Maddison Beery, Ava Box, Shyann Harris, Elijah Klenda, Kaelynn Metro, Josh Smith, Jesse Snyder, Tandice Tajchman and MaKayla West.

Choral

Baton – Shaliah Ensley and Eldon Smith.

Boys Set – Harrison Beery, Cooper Brewer, Vlad Harris, Elijah Klenda, Keenan Lange, Kadon Mercer, Jaxon Salsbury, Eldon Smith, Jesse Snyder and Wyatt Be.

Backing Vocals — Lexi Branson, Alexandra Carlson, Margaret Collett, Kaden Smith, Isaac Wesner, Jordy Raymer and Keenan Lange.

League solos – Lexi Branson, Maria Carlson and Jessica Methvin (I rating); Keenan Lange (I-); Gabrielle Stuchlik and Isaac Wesner (II+); and Shaliah Ensley, Hitch Be, Eldon Smith and Kaden Smith (II).

Music — Maria Carlson and Elijah Klenda.

Do it for your school

Grade 8 – Maria Carlson and Keenan Lange.

Grade 7 – Jessica Methvin and Jordy Raymer.

Grade 6 — Rylee Thomas and Ryker Salsbury.

Lexile reading

Grade 8 – Breane Williams.

Grade 7 – Zayden Janzen and Kaelynn Metro.

Grade 6 — Alexandra Carlson and Braydn Pohlman.

quiz bowl

Grade 8—Elijah Klenda (top scorer) and Harrison Beery, Lexi Branson, Samuel Calvert, Maria Carlson, Daisy Giles, Shyann Harris, Vlad Harris, Hailey Harshman, Keenan Lange, Jaxon Salsbury, Kattie Stultz, Breane Williams and Naomi Wilson.

Grade 7 – Jordy Raymer (top scorer) and Maddison Beery, Margaret Collett, Delaney Hostetler, Jackson Howard, Dylan Kraus, Teegan Kraus, Jessica Methvin, Kaelynn Metro, Kaden Smith, Hitch Be, Isaac Wesner and Kate Wessel.

student advice

Grade 8 – Cooper Brewer, Keenan Lange, Eldon Smith and Gabrielle Stuchlik.

Grade 7 – Cooper Jirak, Jordy Raymer, Kaden Smith and Hitch Be.

Grade 6 – Dalton Boone, Alexandra Carlson, Kevon Jones and Shelby Summerville.

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